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    This is part of our Featured Varieties Collection

    This rare, cold hardy, and drought tolerant variety of Agave is native to the higher elevations of the San Bernadino Mountains in California. This variety is one of only two recognized varieties of Agave utahensis and is the most cold tolerant. Very slow growing, this agave is about two feet tall when mature, and has stalks reaching up to 15 feet tall that produce yellow greenish flowers.

    Edible (heart, leaves, root, sap, seeds, flower stalk)

    Hearts?- high sugar content?and can be eaten when baked. A very nice flavor, though fibrous. Can also be dried and used as a flavoring.? Roots?- can be eaten when cooked. Sap -?collected from cut flowering stems, or by tapping a hole at the base of the plant. Sap contains concentrated sugars and can be used as a syrup, or fermented into alcohol. Seeds?- ground into flour. Flower stalks?- can be eaten when cooked (roasted).

    Medicinal (antiseptic, diuretic, laxative)

    The sap is?antiseptic, diuretic, and laxative.

    Utility (fiber, soap)

    Fiber - a strong and durable fiber?from the leaves can be used to make rope, brushes, fabric, and paper. Soap - an extract from the leaves can be used as a soap.?Made by quickly boiling chopped leaves.This rare, cold hardy, and drought tolerant variety of Agave is native to the higher elevations of the San Bernadino Mountains in California. This variety is one of only two recognized varieties of Agave utahensis and is the most cold tolerant. Very slow growing, this agave is about two feet tall when mature, and has stalks reaching up to 15 feet tall that produce yellow greenish flowers.

    Edible (heart, leaves, root, sap, seeds, flower stalk)

    Hearts?- high sugar content?and can be eaten when baked. A very nice flavor, though fibrous. Can also be dried and used as a flavoring.? Roots?- can be eaten when cooked. Sap -?collected from cut flowering stems, or by tapping a hole at the base of the plant. Sap contains concentrated sugars and can be used as a syrup, or fermented into alcohol. Seeds?- ground into flour. Flower stalks?- can be eaten when cooked (roasted).

    Medicinal (antiseptic, diuretic, laxative)

    The sap is?antiseptic, diuretic, and laxative.

    Utility (fiber, soap)

    Fiber - a strong and durable fiber?from the leaves can be used to make rope, brushes, fabric, and paper. Soap - an extract from the leaves can be used as a soap.?Made by quickly boiling chopped leaves.
    Zones USDA 5-9
    Life Cycle perennial evergreen
    Germination sow on surface and barely cover with starting soil, soil temp should be 70F+, requires light to germinate
    Uses edible (heart, leaves, root, sap, seeds, flower stalk), medicinal, utility (fiber, soap)
    Notes drought and pest resistant
    Breed Status open pollinated
    Characteristics yellow green flowers bloom in spring and summer
    Habit/Size 18-24 in. wide, 24-28 in. tall, flowering stalks can reach up to 15 ft.
    Requirements full sun, sandy - well drained soil, low water req.

    This rare, cold hardy, and drought tolerant variety of Agave is native to the higher elevations of the San Bernadino Mountains in California. This variety is one of only two recognized varieties of Agave utahensis and is the most cold tolerant. Very slow growing, this agave is about two feet tall when mature, and has stalks reaching up to 15 feet tall that produce yellow greenish flowers.

    Edible (heart, leaves, root, sap, seeds, flower stalk)

    Hearts - high sugar content and can be eaten when baked. A very nice flavor, though fibrous. Can also be dried and used as a flavoring. 

    Roots - can be eaten when cooked.

    Sap - collected from cut flowering stems, or by tapping a hole at the base of the plant. Sap contains concentrated sugars and can be used as a syrup, or fermented into alcohol.

    Seeds - ground into flour.

    Flower stalks - can be eaten when cooked (roasted).

    Medicinal (antiseptic, diuretic, laxative)

    The sap is antiseptic, diuretic, and laxative.

    Utility (fiber, soap)

    Fiber - a strong and durable fiber from the leaves can be used to make rope, brushes, fabric, and paper.

    Soap - an extract from the leaves can be used as a soap. Made by quickly boiling chopped leaves.

     

     

     



    Always consult a medical professional before consuming any plants, including plants labeled "edible" or "medicinal". Click here for more information.

    Purchasers are responsible for understanding and complying with all local laws, restrictions, and regulations. The extent Amkha Seed LLC can be held liable for damages is limited to replacement of the item, or a refund of the purchase price (within 30 days of purchase). Click here for more information.

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